The script seemed solid enough but if you’ve hung out in forums and discussion boards in the past two years or so, some arguments will seem familiar to you.

And while I consider myself quite competent when it comes to comic book mythology (thanks to those Marvel playing cards that I used to pore over when I was in high school), the Marvel Cinematic Universe can be quite overwhelming to newcomers. But of you really, really want to be able to understand the final installment in MCU’s third phase — that’s Avengers: Endgame in plain talk, the Russo Brothers recently shared that you need to watch at least these four movies, just to be on the same page. 

All in all, “Switched” will make you frustrated because it had lead characters that you will completely fall in love with, a villainess you can’t completely hate and a story that makes you want more. I’m not completely 100 percent okay with the ending because my heart is still mourning but I would rewatch this series for many more times in the future, for sure because its just so good.  

Bundy will forever be etched in history as one of the most notorious serial killers in history because he is the poster boy for the saying that one should not judge a book by its cover. The evil that he has committed and his obvious pride at what he has accomplished is a terrifying wake up call that transcends generations. As much as I would want to judge him with compassion, it would be far too difficult to do so, knowing what he has done and what future he deprived those women of when he ended their lives. Still, he may have gotten his wish in the end. He made a name for himself alright, only, not as a revered public figure, but rather a reviled character that nightmares are made of. 

All in all, Rampant had great production value and practical effects that worked. The politics outweighed the horror and action parts but the final 30 minutes more than amped up the excitement value of the film. Rampant was a good movie and while it had a similar premise as Kingdom, the two productions could not be compared. They own had their unique styles of storytelling that worked well for their platform. 

I was touched by the message of The Room, a manifestation of Tommy’s dream of having a world where everybody loved everybody. It was a conversation about being accepted fully and unconditionally, despite outward appearances, and despite being different. I salute Tommy for following his dreams even though nobody really believed in him. I’m happy he found a true believer in Franco. It takes a lot of courage and confidence to do something while being faced with everyone’s ridicule and I’m happy that this “documentary” was able to show Tommy’s heart, even if it not reveal his true identity. 

I liked that this film was about a disaster but it was more about people. While most films who deal with an ensemble cast often sacrifice the character building for the sake of balancing the exposure of the stars, DW made sure that audiences establish a connection with each of the characters before it dished out the disaster.(This film also had Dylan O’Brien and Kate Hudson in the cast)