All in all, Looks that Kill was a heartwarming and touching movie. It had a beautiful, but realistic message. It made viewers fall in love, laugh, cry and wonder. And it kept them interested until the very end. Thanks to a reliable cast and writer/director Kellen Moore, this just became one of my instant favorites.

The new film tried to build more layers to the tale, but the story got away from them. Black Christmas 2019 was a mess from start to finish. Moral Lessons: Don’t fix what ain’t broken. Just because you could doesn’t mean you should. Don’t try to flip a classic just to prove you are better. Because in this case, the remake, developed over 30 years later than the original, was far inferior to the 1974 classic IN ALL ASPECTS.

I was blown away by Demon Slayer: Mugen Train because of the beautiful and consistent animation all throughout. There was no bad panel, not even one. The use 3D in combination with 2D animation was seamlessly crafted. The fight scenes never missed a beat. The use of perfect background music to accompany each scene made me ugly cry 25 percent of the movie and kept me suspended in suspense the remainder of the time.

It really hits viewers in the gut, not only because the delicious food on display are mouth watering. The scenes from the food preparation, as well as the stories behind them makes the audience yearn for the days that they can travel back to Ilocos to experience the dishes for themselves. The documentary gives faces to the people behind the extraordinary food that provides comfort and joy like no other. In the same vein, it is heartbreaking to learn of their challenges during this pandemic, which is ill deserved for these people whose joy is cooking.

ur Space raises several relationship issues — friendship, romance and the fine line in between. I appreciated the repartee but by its end I was just as tired about the argument as the characters were. The cinematography was on point. The dialogue was intelligent but by its end, it left me more frustrated than satisfied. Finally, it was over. It felt like I was the one stepping out of a bad breakup. Good one, director David Olson and screenwriter Joem Antonio.

Its intended to be funny, true. But I was unsure what message filmmaker Kevin Mayuga wanted to get across. Humor can be kind of dangerous when it is taken out of context. Was the film promoting drugs as a means to escape the toils of life? Even though seeing their maid passed out from her high made the kids realize how they put her through the ringer, leading to their remorse and reform, was the proper ending to bond over a weed session?