HoTD is doing a good job covering diversity and gender issues, actually without being too preachy about it. Its just part of the realities of the narrative and the show needs not explain itself overmuch about what it is trying to say. Its an intelligent way to treat its audience and it is something, I think that is not lost on the show’s viewers. So thank you, HBO.

Can I just say how much I love the dynamic between uncle and niece? And I also love how despite his jealousy and own ambitions for the Iron Throne, Daemon obviously loves his brother and niece very dearly. Its a sappy way to look at it but Matt Smith effectively conveys these conflicting emotions. Its hard to hate Daemon fully although he is being portrayed as a heel when he easily reneges a position of advantage because he could not bear hurting his kin. And when Lord Corlys starts to badmouth his brother, even though just an episode ago he was doing the same, he puts him in his place and says that only he is allowed to talk badly about the King. It was so much fun to watch.

For this season, Eddie had most of the best lines, even more than Vecna himself. When he quoted LOTR at Skull Rock and referred to marching to Mordor, he set many nerdy hearts aflutter. When he dedicated his guitar solo to Chrissy, he made the scene as poignant as it was badas*. When he talked to Dustin about leading the Hellfire Club, there was sincerity in his words. When he made an epic final stand against the Demobats, it was glorious.

In a future when humankind is robbed of sight, what’s left of civilization rebuild their way of life without being able to see. However, as the twin children of Baba Voss (Jason Momoa) is discovered to be born with the gift, they become the target of those in power who fear that soeciety will be threatened by their unique advantage. 

After HBO ended its epic series Game of Thrones after the eighth season, fans of the show have been dealing with a void in their life that they never knew existed until they didn’t have the George RR Martin adaptation to love and hate (for the final season, at least). Networks and streaming platforms are now jostling to fill this demand with adaptations of literary sagas and game series that have a grown a strong following over the years.  Will His Dark Materials and The Witcher fill the gap?