The Peacemaker, but plotwise, it seems to be going somewhere. There’s also a very stylistic approach to the series and a really cool soundtrack so I’ll stick around some more until I make my final decision.

Sure, there were also some attempts at drama but they didn’t seem to make as much impact because it was really unclear who the real villain of the piece was. And because nothing really surprising actually happens, it seemed a bit derivative copycat of previous sci fi works. The Silent Sea really had a lot of potential. Too bad it wasn’t able to deliver fully on it.

Personally, apart from my dismay that the entire first season was set up as a bait for a second season of Hellbound, I was still a big fan. Hellbound was not just a conversation about religion and morality but it also talked of corruption and desperation. It expounded on the concept of free will and how humankind regards it in their daily lives. It left the conversation wide open on the gray areas between good and evil. It prompted a lot of reflection, and its a huge thing for a supernatural series to hit its mark so deeply that its message resonates and applies to the real lives of the audience.

rom being an exciting and compelling binge, this series was also a well crafted social commentary about humans and the extent of their imperfections. It urged viewers to examine society from a different lens. Were the games a kindness or cruelty for its participants? Did it save them from their misery or were their deaths a welcome respite from their drudgery?

After fearing the zombies for the better part of two seasons of Kingdom, Ashin of the North made me want to root for them somewhat because of this special episode. As usual, I was blown away by everything, from the production, to the story (Kim Eun Hee), to the masterful direction (Kim Seong Hoon) — and to think this was shot during a pandemic. Amazing. The level of badassery in this installment was nothing short of masterful. Bravo! Well done, Netflix!