Cinematography-wise, pacing-wise and storytelling wise, it was a lot of fun, especially with the filmmaker’s choice of background music that gave the film a eclectic retro feel. It was a well crafted film although it was also tinted with the director’s views. Again, its not going to be a film for everybody. So if you are sensitive about the issue of religion or faith, you might want to brace yourself before sitting down to watch Kids on Fire.

All in all, “Svaha: The Sixth Finger” was far from extraordinary. It was not scary. It was not thought-provoking. It was boring, but it did touch on the very real issue of religious fanaticism, which is present in all types of religion, left unchecked. It was a movie that technically did everything right but failed on the level that it did not evoke much of an impact given the material it covered. Sometimes, talking above an audience’s head takes its toll and it took its toll for this movie, big time. For me, at least.

All in all, the idea that the ending presented was scarier than all the demons that showed up to scare the living daylights out of the deacons. It was thought provoking and it was eerie. It was a beautifully mounted thriller but with one fatal flaw — its lead star. And despite all the good that the film had going for it, it was a bothersome downer.